Reaching Out MBA

Reaching Out MBA

04

Apr 2016

Out Women in Business 2016 Recap

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Thank you for joining us for #OWiB2016 - Friday was a blast! 320 registrants spent the day learning from and connecting with one another at the Out Women in Business Conference in New York. We couldn’t have pulled off this great conference without our presenting sponsors: AccentureEYLiberty Mutual, our reception sponsor: Citi, and our airline sponsor: United Airlines.
As a recap, beginning around 9:00am, we heard from some incredible speakers and thinkers who broadened our minds and challenged what it means to be an out woman at work.
Arwa Mahdawi gave us a view into the complexities of diversity at work today. She spoke about how to avoid tokenism and combat institutional inequality. Taking on the adage of “you catch more flies with honey than vinegar,” Arwa uses humor to combat inequality. In fact, she created the satirical website Rent-A-Minority to shine a spotlight on systemic inequality!
global panel
After Arwa’s talk, we learned from five incredible people about being out women across the world. Representing Europe, Asia, and South America, Milena Otasevic (one of our steering committee members from the Atkinson Graduate School of Management at Willamette University) spoke withMaria Sjödin (OutRight Action International), Karen Potter (Citi), Maital Dar (EY), and Bachul Koul (A.T. Kearney) at length. They each talked about their experiences, particularly speaking to how difficult it can be to be out in regions of the world where homosexuality is either still a crime or not widely accepted in society.
design workshop
After a brief break, we dug into design thinking with Lotus Child from Arson Agency. Lotus led us in a workshop to push our boundaries and keep our creativity flowing when we approach problems and design solutions. Jacob Tobia, a genderqueer activist, taught us about how problematic the gender binary is for gender justice. They encouraged us to open our minds when we think about what an “out woman” is.
other industries panel
Jennifer Brown facilitated a discussion across industries between  Annise Parker,  Roberta Kaplan, and Nevin Caple. Each of them gave lessons from their own experiences — in politics, law and sports, respectively — about how being an LBT woman has affected their professional lives and where they think the moment for equality is headed. Finally, we learned from  Vivienne Ming‘s time in the tech industry and her research on the unexpected tax on LGBT people due to recruiting in the job market. She gave us great insights into how to combat the stigma from the work she’s doing. We closed off Friday with a networking reception at the end of the day, sponsored by Citi.
SCAN NYC photo
Then on Saturday a small group of OWiB attendees came together to meet with a dozen inner-city at-risk LBT youth for a mentor program with SCAN NY (facilitated by United).  Those who were able to attend walked away inspired by their experience.
Thanks to everyone who came to learn, speak, and support Out Women in Business! We hope to see all of you again at the conference next Spring.

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09

Mar 2016

NCAA, It’s Time to #GiveBackIX

Posted by / in Blog, LGBTQ BUSINESS STUDENT BLOG, Uncategorized / No comments yet

Reaching Out is proud to join a coalition of over 70 LGBTQ, sports, religious, and youth advocacy groups calling on the NCAA to divest from all religious-based institutions who have made Title IX requests to discriminate against LGBTQ youth. In 2014, the U.S. Department of Education decided to include protection for transgender students under Title IX, triggering these religious exemption requests from 59 NCAA member institutions on Campus Pride’s #ShameList.

We stand with Campus Pride reminding the NCAA of its core values of integrity, inclusive culture, and sportsmanship. The NCAA should continue its longstanding commitment to diversity and inclusion of all people, regardless of sexual orientation and gender identity or expression. Transgender people already face systemic discrimination and disproportionate rates of poverty, suicide, and murder. Schools that are affiliated with the NCAA should be dedicated to fostering a campus that allows all students to flourish both academically and in co-curricular activities such as athletics.

Along with Campus Pride and the other signatories on the letter to the NCAA President, NCAA Executive Team, and NCAA Board of Governors, Reaching Out is committed to the students at all of our LGBT Club Affiliate schools, and we hope to see movement from the NCAA on this matter soon. It’s time to #GiveBackIX.

08

Mar 2016

Why we need Out Women in Business

Posted by / in Blog, LGBTQ BUSINESS STUDENT BLOG, Uncategorized / No comments yet

Can you name a woman at the top of her field? We’ll give you a few seconds. While you think, here’s some Wonder Woman.

wonder woman gif

Got one in your mind? Good. Here’s just a few guesses on where your brain wandered. Maybe you went political and thought of Hillary Clinton or Angela Merkel. Perhaps your mind went to the business world and thought of Mary Barra or Indra Nooyi – the CEOs of GM and PepsiCo, respectively. Maybe you even thought about music, and Katy Perry or Beyoncé came to mind. These women are admirable and accomplished, breaking glass ceilings whenever they face them. In addition to all being women, they have something else in common: they’re all straight (at least as far as we know).

Lesbian, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LBTQ) women are woefully underrepresented in business. Actually, that’s not entirely true. I have no doubt that LBTQ women are well-represented; they’re just not out at work. That’s understandable given the well-established evidence that women and LGBTQ people both face potential discrimination in the workplace. The data on LGBTQ people of color and employment is even more stark. But none of this will change unless we work together, as a community, to make sure that people can be out at work. Non-discrimination protection is key, but so is creating a strong network of LBTQ women to lean on for support, guidance, and development on how to be out at work. That’s where the Out Women in Business (OWIB) Conference comes in.

On April 1, we’ll meet in New York at OWIB to create a more united and visible community of out women in different industries. Together, we can form a strong, visible network of professionals that will inspire future generations of LBTQ women. Come and learn from some incredible speakers as they share their experiences of being out at work. Let’s change those statistics about LBTQ women and unemployment. Let’s work as a community to be more out, more present at work. Let’s turn the “double glass ceiling” narrative on its head. Register here for OWIB and build the world we want to live and work in.

 

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