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28

Oct 2017

Meet the LGBTQ MBA Fellows: Esme Rhine

Posted by / in LGBTQ BUSINESS STUDENT BLOG / No comments yet

The Reaching Out LGBT MBA Fellowship is a scholarship and leadership development program for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer and active ally MBAs in full-time programs. Each Fellows receives at least $10,000 funding per academic year (or $20,000 total for his/her/their two years) in addition free access to all Reaching Out programming (including the ROMBA Conference), LGBTQ mentors, digital programming, and a leadership summit exclusively for the Fellows.  Since the inception of the ROMBA Fellowship 129 students have received over US$6.2M in scholarship support from participating schools. This fall Reaching Out welcomed the third class of the ROMBA Fellows. These 56 fellows come from 35 top business schools and over the next month we’ll introduce each of them to you. 41 MBA programs will be part of the Fellowship for the 2017-2018 application cycle. To learn about the Fellowship and let schools know of your interest here.

MEET ESME RHINE (CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY, TEPPER SCHOOL OF BUSINESS)

I have always been naturally inquisitive. One huge benefit to growing up in a small town in central Oregon is being surrounded by some of the most gorgeous landscape in the country. This instilled in me a deep love of the outdoors. Hiking, mountain biking, climbing, backpacking, I loved anything that enabled me to explore outside. I found this curiosity also spilled over into the classroom. For college, I attended MIT and majored in materials science and engineering. I fell in love with materials engineering because it allowed me to study a wide variety of technologies, from biomaterials to optics. At MIT I I learned how seemingly opposite technologies can be interlinked, and how to apply my engineering skills to any problem. My projects there not only taught me the science behind the technology, but also how to apply my knowledge to the real world. After graduating from MIT, I wanted to go somewhere I could apply my technical background and be challenged to grow in a fast paced environment. Intel was that place for me. I joined as a supply chain engineer and quickly had to learn how to jump from technology to technology and problem to problem. With these experiences in mind, I am entering Tepper to lay the foundation for my future career, combining my engineering career and complex problem-solving ability with the finance strategies and business techniques I will gain from an MBA.

What made you consider business school?
I wanted to round out my engineering background with the skills and knowledge that an MBA provides. One thing studying engineering has taught me is how to view problems in different ways and how to quantitatively back up my decisions. Combining this with a sound understanding of finance and leadership skills will allow me more versatility in my career.

What are you most excited about in terms of your time in business school?
I am most excited about all the amazing people I’ll be able to meet and learning how I can make an impact in whatever role I’m in.

Who are some leaders (in the LGBTQ community, in business, or in society) that most inspire you?
Serena Williams, Lynn Conway, Indra Nooyi

What’s one thing everyone should know about you?
I’m a huge Pittsburgh sports fan. Go pens!

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28

Oct 2017

Meet the LGBTQ MBA Fellows: Elizabeth Terry

Posted by / in LGBTQ BUSINESS STUDENT BLOG / No comments yet

The Reaching Out LGBT MBA Fellowship is a scholarship and leadership development program for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer and active ally MBAs in full-time programs. Each Fellows receives at least $10,000 funding per academic year (or $20,000 total for his/her/their two years) in addition free access to all Reaching Out programming (including the ROMBA Conference), LGBTQ mentors, digital programming, and a leadership summit exclusively for the Fellows.  Since the inception of the ROMBA Fellowship 129 students have received over US$6.2M in scholarship support from participating schools.

This fall Reaching Out welcomed the third class of the ROMBA Fellows. These 56 fellows come from 35 top business schools and over the next month we’ll introduce each of them to you.

41 MBA programs will be part of the Fellowship for the 2017-2018 application cycle. To learn about the Fellowship and let schools know of your interest here.

MEET ELIZABETH TERRY  (GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF BUSINESS)

Elizabeth is passionate about education, creative writing, logistics, and social justice. She is an entrepreneur doing business with the core values of sustainability, positive corporate culture, and supportive management. She worked as a special education teacher, non-profit executive director, and founder of several companies. She’s raised over 1.5 million dollars, received teaching excellence awards, and is currently launching an athletic apparel line and community of support for women sized 00-5XL. She and Erin, her wife, got married in the summer of 2015 on a mountain in California. Elizabeth enjoys reading non-fiction, watching well-written television, and taking her dog to the park.

What made you consider business school?
After co-founding a start up in the fall of 2016, I realized that there was a lot to learn about starting and running businesses. After extensive research, I decided to get an MBA to build a solid foundation of content and process knowledge as well as increase my network. I also think the lack of women and LGBTQ individuals in the business world often contributes to disparities like biased hiring and pay inequity. I wanted to be part of reversing such practices.

What are you most excited about in terms of your time in business school?I am excited to learn as much as I can from my professors, classmates, and network. I want to understand where I can best utilize my skills to maximize impact for others beyond profits and growth. I am excited to meet people who challenge me to grow.

Who are some of the leaders (in the LGBTQ community, in business, or in society) that most inspire you?
I am inspired by those who found a platform and a voice within it for the betterment of society. Tyler Oakley, a youtube star with almost 8 million followers, used his teen appeal to work for the Trevor Project, work with Ellen Degeneres, and just launched a series called “Chosen Family” about LGBTQ history and lives in America. I am also inspired by the intelligent navigation of Barack and Michelle Obama since leaving public office.

What’s one thing everyone should know about you?
I’ve been told my superpower is listening. I naturally deeply listen and am inclined to help solve any problem I come across.

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27

Oct 2017

Meet the LGBTQ MBA Fellows: Dayna Hine

Posted by / in LGBTQ BUSINESS STUDENT BLOG / No comments yet

The Reaching Out LGBT MBA Fellowship is a scholarship and leadership development program for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer and active ally MBAs in full-time programs. Each Fellows receives at least $10,000 funding per academic year (or $20,000 total for his/her/their two years) in addition free access to all Reaching Out programming (including the ROMBA Conference), LGBTQ mentors, digital programming, and a leadership summit exclusively for the Fellows.  Since the inception of the ROMBA Fellowship 129 students have received over US$6.2M in scholarship support from participating schools.

This fall Reaching Out welcomed the third class of the ROMBA Fellows. These 56 fellows come from 35 top business schools and over the next month we’ll introduce each of them to you.

41 MBA programs will be part of the Fellowship for the 2017-2018 application cycle. To learn about the Fellowship and let schools know of your interest here.

MEET DAYNA HINE (UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, ROSS SCHOOL OF BUSINESS)

I grew up in Connecticut and attended the University of Connecticut where I earned a degree in Political Science, Women’s Studies and Human Rights. I dedicated my spare time to advocating for women’s and LGBTQ rights as the head of the university’s Gay Straight Alliance, as a wellness educator and through internships to support the HIV positive and the transgender communities. I started my career in the nonprofit sector, eventually landing in the San Francisco Bay Area. I combined my love of process and building with activism throughout my career. My most notable career distinction is building the infrastructure of Girls Who Code to support the movement’s rapid growth to 40,000. I love staying active, baking, watching football (Go Blue!), and spending time in Central Park with my fiancé, Rocky.

What made you consider business school?
The main factor in my decision to attend business school was my desire to have more flexibility in my career advancement. Working at a high growth company gave me exposure to other sectors outside of the nonprofit space that piqued my interest. My long term goal is to start my own social enterprise company; however, I am looking forward to exploring and building my professional skills and network in the private sector to build up to my goal. Business school was a clear way to make a career transition, while expanding my professional network and meeting other emerging business leaders and mentors.

What are you most excited about in terms of your time in business school?The people! I attribute a good portion of my career success to learning from incredible colleagues and mentors and I’m excited to have the opportunity to meet a group of classmates with diverse sets of backgrounds and specialties to continue to learn from. I’m also looking forward to learning from some of the brightest minds in business through my professors. And, of course, I’m very excited for University of Michigan football!

Who are some of the leaders (in the LGBTQ community, in business, or in society) that most inspire you?
This might be bit cliché, but I look up to Ellen Degeneres and Rachel Maddow. Both women paved the way for younger generations to have an easier path to being themselves and risked everything to get there. I did not grow up with exposure to the LGBTQ community and the two women were the visible leaders I was looking for – one as a friendly face in the room and the other as a fierce intellect. I was able to see a little bit of myself in each of them which was was essential to my personal development. The other business leaders that I look up to are my parents. They might not be famous, but they taught me the value in doing well by others and maintaining integrity, even when it’s most challenging.

What’s one thing everyone should know about you?
I’m terrible at relaxing. I love being busy all of the time and exploring or learning something new. It’s been great for meeting new people and trying out new hobbies, like rugby and flag football, but is not great for my friends who like beach and spa days.

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